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Posted under: Beauty

Amber Riley's candid tweets will empower new naturalistas to love their kinks

Disclaimer: This is not an attack on any personal beauty standards of black women. There is no absence of struggle in finding comfort in your skin as a black woman. White beauty is the standard in America, and we've been conditioned to believe in it. White features such as straight (or not too curly) hair, light-colored eyes and white (or light) skin often appeal to all of us, whether we know it or not. This issue is so deeply rooted that many cosmetology schools don't even teach stylists how to style black hair. Understanding this, it's no wonder why there's such a huge debate when it comes to natural hair. Some women will defend their perms until the end of time, fighting away every assumption that they subscribe to white beauty stands. Others have tip-toed on the line between going natural and staying with the creamy crack. And if they do decide to go natural, it's an adjustment. Many of us are far from being comfortable in our own beauty. No matter how you spin it, the images we have consumed in traditional media have taught us that our natural beauty isn't natural. When we don't see women who look like us naturally, the sight of us natural looks strange. And, if you go to school or work in a predominately white environment, it's even harder. Earlier this week, former Glee star and The Wiz alum Amber Riley briefly touched upon her personal struggle of accepting her own natural beauty. In two simple tweets, she unearthed a discussion about beauty that needs to be had more often.

Here's why this is important:

  • The natural hair movement has been a way for black women to find a new sense of comfort in their own skin and natural beauty.
  • Simply knowing that another black woman faces this same personal adversity provides a sense of comfort to those who feel challenged when they look in the mirror.
  • Seeing this vulnerability from a black celebrity will allow others to confront their own (not yet realized) internal battle with accepting themselves in a natural state.

Let's continue this conversation. Share your thoughts in the comments below.

Photo: Giphy
Photo: Giphy
Photo: Giphy

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