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Posted under: Culture News

A Former Wall Street Exec Grew Tired Of Dolls Not Representing Daughter So She Decided To Make Her Own

Múkami Kinoti Kimoth has launched a Kickstarter to make her line of dolls available to everyone.

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After Múkami Kinoti Kimoth's daughter told her that she did not feel pretty, she wanted to change that.  

So she decided to create a line of dolls that looked like her daughter Zara because, like the adage goes, representation matters. Her line of dolls, Royelles, will be more than a line of toys. They will be avatars and super heroines that inspire young girls to be innovators and trailblazers, warriors, leaders and artists. 

Photo: Giphy
Photo: Giphy

“I was heartbroken when my daughter shared with me that she thought she wasn’t pretty like her other friends,” Kimoth said in the campaign video. “I’ve spoken to hundreds of other mothers and it turns out that we’ve had the same experience and want the same things for our girls! We want them to know, deep down, that they are fierce, that they are more than enough, that they are fully equipped to do great things with their lives. We need them to know that a girl’s difference is her superpower.”

At one time, Kimoth was vice president and senior consultant at BNY Mellon on Wall Street before founding and serving as CEO and chief creative officer of Royelles Inc., and JOODJ.com. Now, she is trying to prevent other girls from feeling the way Zara did. 

Photo: Royelles
Photo: Royelles

Earlier this week, Royelles launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for the production of their first avatar Mara - The Warrior Princess.

Mara is only one of 13 other avatars in the Royelles collection. Thus far, the campaign has raised nearly $15,000 and counting.

"We spent the last two years prototyping, tweaking and refining this initial collection of avatars," the campaign page read. "We conducted extensive market research, facilitated multiple focus groups with moms, guardians and young girls, and created a few iterations of prototypes until we perfected our designs and approach."

Photo: Royelles
Photo: Royelles

The funds will continue the meticulous process and go to creating the molds, producing body forms and apparel, educational components, packaging and transport to their distribution warehouse.

With only 25 days left to go, supporters can donate to help change the perception of beauty in young girls' minds. 

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Atlanta-based creative, dope photographer, journalist and lover of all types of wings.
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