With Stacey Abrams And Brian Kemp Neck-And-Neck In The Polls, Atlanta Suburb Precincts Experience Technical Delays

Three precincts decided to use paper ballots while another precinct will extend its hours.

Photo credit:Twitter

| November 07 2018,

7:55 pm

Georgia's gubernatorial election has drawn the world's attention as its result could be historic. Democrat Stacey Abrams is going head-to-with with the GOP's Brian Kemp, and the Democrat would be the U.S.' first Black woman governor should she win.

Voter suppression has also been a significant concern in the state, with Georgia's NAACP filing a complaint after voters claimed their early voting ballots were changed from Abrams to Kemp. 

Now it appears machines in Georgia's Gwinnett County are having trouble on Election Day. According to the New York Times four precincts in the county are experiencing technical delays. Three of the precincts resorted to using paper ballots. The fourth eventually managed to get its electronic ballot boxes functioning properly again, and will extend voting hours due to the delay.

“We’ve got people who are voting with the paper ballots, and we’ve got people who are standing to wait for the machines to be fixed, and we’ve got people who said they are planning to come back,” said Gwinnett County spokesperson Joe Sorenson. 

After a video surfaced of several prospective voters waiting in a long line at Anderson Livsey Elementary in Snellville, Georgia, side eyes were certainly raised. 




Georgia's polling places are seeing rather lengthy lines. While some voters confirmed they were able to vote with ease, others noted extended wait times. As The Hill reports, Abrams and Kemp are currently in a dead heat per recent polls, so this election truly will come down to the wire. 


Now, check these out: 

Judge Rules Brian Kemp Must Allow Georgians Flagged As 'Noncitizens' To Vote Days Before Election

Georgia Voting Machines Are Allegedly Changing Ballots For Stacey Abrams To Votes For Brian Kemp

We Talked To Stacey Abrams About Everything From Her Romance Novels To Her Plans For Georgia's Future