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Posted under: News Culture

Over 1,000 Black Women Convened In Atlanta For The Power Rising Summit On How To Own, Grow Their Power

"When you give to Black women, you’re giving back to the community."

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The Power Rising Summit took over Atlanta this past weekend with black women from all over the country coming to engage. The summit, planned for and by black women, was sold out and packed with celebrities, politicians and activists in attendance. The four-day event drew upwards of 1,000 attendees with the goal of "helping African-American women leverage their political, economic and social power in order to move themselves, their communities and the nation forward," according to NBC.

"Black women own more than 1.5 million businesses. We are the largest users of social media and we know that we are cultural influencers,” said co-convener the Rev. Leah Daughtry. “The summit will bring together black women from across the country and all different walks of life. It will focus on our political prowess, our economic power and our cultural influence.”The summit is organized around five pillars of activism and engagement: business and economic empowerment; culture and community; education, technology and innovation; health and wellness; and political empowerment. This year's agenda was #Put5onit, encouraging everyone in the quest for change to get their starting five. "Support 5 Black women candidates. Register 5 Black women to vote. Mentor & Learn from 5 Black women. Reserve 5 hours for Health & Wellness each week. Spend money in 5 Black business," Star Jones wrote. 

Among the well-known names participating in the summit were Angela Rye, Cicely Tyson, Chirlane McCray, Luvvie Ajayi, Beverly Bond of Black Girls Rock and political strategist Symone Sanders, plus many more.

There were discussions happening for black women across professions, religion and sexual orientation. Regardless of any of those factors, what was being realized is the power that black women possess economically, politically and socially. We have the power to invoke change. 

“As Alabama showed, we are a force and we come with receipts," Aimee Allison, president of Democracy in Color said noting her excitement about the prospects of Black women strategizing “how to come fully” into leadership roles. "Back our leaders, elevate our issues, and put our voting strength in the center of a multiracial coalition that can take back our country. Ignore us and risk alienating the very voters needed to win."

The summit was filled with amazing moments and even more amazing women. Check out a few below.




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Malinda is a staff writer for Blavity, freelance content creator, and executive assistant residing in Cleveland, OH. As a proud graduate of Mississippi Valley State University, she loves all things HBCU. In her free time she enjoys being a bomb plant mom, self-care, bottomless mimosas and painting. Contact by email: malindajny@gmail.com