How to gain self-love by embracing insecurities

How to gain self-love by embracing insecurities
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| February 24 2016,

10:30 am


In a society where imperfections are shunned and 'perfection' is the standard, it's no wonder the insecurities are widespread. Nearly everyone has felt insecure about something at some point in their lives. We're either too fat, too skinny, too tall, too short — the list goes on. Insecurities are not limited to body image, but also apply to personality — too shy, too arrogant, too smart

Photo Credit: Pexels
Photo: Pexels
But what if we turned those insecurities into self-love and celebration, embracing what makes us unique? Our differences, or what we perceive as flaws, are what sets us apart. Besides, it's up to us to determine whose opinion matters most when it comes to how we view ourselves, and what we regard as our own personal beauty standards
Valerie (@unapologetic_us)
Photo Credit: Valerie Robinson
Photo: Valerie Robinson
fixAfrica @AfricaMiranda
Photo Credit: Africa Miranda
Photo Credit: Africa Miranda
"I was insecure about my lips growing up — I didn't see any other black girls with lips as small/thin as mine. Today I focus on them less because I've been told by many that my smile is one of my best features. I love making people laugh and smile, so it makes me feel good that people like to see me smile, too!" - Tamesha
Photo Credit: Tumblr
Photo: Tumblr
@foodlovetog @kendence
Photo Credit: createherstock
Photo: createherstock
@lisaalamode (IG, Youtube, FB)
Photo Credit: Lisa a la mode
Photo: Lisa a la mode
- @daniellefaust (Twitter) @thedanifaust (IG) @fitnoire
Photo Credit: createherstock
Photo: createherstock
"As a kid, teen, and well into adulting, I was insecure about pretty much every aspect of my personality — the way I thought, my interests, the way I spoke, how I viewed the world... There is not a lot of tolerance for difference in southern small town, USA. I spent a lot of time trying to mute myself and fit in. Now, I absolutely love and own my individuality. I no longer apologize for it. It has turned out to be my greatest and most valuable asset." - Ebony F.
Photo Credit: Tumblr
Photo: Tumblr
"Growing up, I was always taller than most. I was almost 5 feet 10 inches in middle school. As women, we are constantly put into boxes of what society attempts to explain as right or wrong based on social norms. I was very intimidating to some and people normally treated me as older than my age, simply based on how tall I was. For a while, I worried about the fact that none of the boys liked me and what people would say about me when I wore heels or stepped off the court. Being picked on at an early age for something that I now love about myself shaped who I am as a business woman. True confidence is built from being broken down and rebuilding the way you feel about yourself — on your own terms and not how someone else feels about you. We have to teach our youth that you should never apologize for your gifts and that not everyone will receive what they deem to be different." - Kaye Chambers
Photo Credit: createherstock
Photo: createherstock
@mimicutelips (Twitter, IG, FB)
Photo courtesy of: Mimi
Photo: Mimi
"I’m curvy and I’ve always been curvy. Before I came into womanhood I was ashamed of being well-proportioned and it made me insecure. Adolescent boys would brag about having sex with me long before I was ever sexually active. Today, I am proud of my figure and I embrace the power of my sexuality." - De’Janae Evins
Photo Credot: createherstock
Photo: createherstock
- Jonna @naturallyglamTV (YouTube & Twitter) @naturallyglam (FB & IG)
Photo courtesy of: Jonna
Photo: Jonna
"Growing up, I was insecure about my complexion. It was not because I didn't enjoy the hue of my skin or felt as though it made me inferior, but it was an aspect of myself that confused me. All my other friends who were composed of the same mixture as me (African American and Puerto Rican) had lighter complexions and I seemed to be the darkest of that mix. But now, I love the skin I'm in. I love that my skin tone is not only a reflection of an amazing lineage of people, but it also is a reminder to all those who see me that people of color, all people of color, are amazing mixtures of textures and tones (literally). I am now a proud Afro-Latina, inside and out." - Shannon Nia (@ShannonNia)
Photo Credit: createherstock
Photo: createherstock
"During my teen years, I was always extremely insecure about my arms. No matter how fit I got or how much weight I lost, my arms never changed. They felt like wide, flabby attachments. Then one day my dad told me that I have arms just like my grandmother, his mother. From then on, I've learned to love my arms. My grandmother was strong. She held everyone together. My arms are broad and squishy and firm when I need them to be strong. And that's alright with me." - Devonnie B. (@devonnieblack)
Photo Credit: createherstock
Photo: createherstock
"I’ve got a small butt! Even as a young girl, my family used to comment on its flatness. I’ve been teased by friends for it; people thought it was especially odd because I have large breasts and curvy hips, yet lack this particular — for lack of a better word — asset. Although it was all in good fun, I became incredibly self-conscious about my butt. One guy actually used to comment on how much he preferred fat a**es on women...to my face...while we were hooking up. He even told me as I headed home for Thanksgiving to “eat lots of cornbread.”
Photo Credit: Fierce GIFs
Photo: fiercegifs
I don’t know when exactly it happened but somewhere along the way, I stopped caring. My butt is small — so what! I’ll never get to be a member of The Official Twerk Team, but it won’t stop me from celebrating my body. I will always love my little booty because it’s a part of me." - Samantha A. (@Sam_Antrum)
And there you have it. What aspects of yourselves have you been insecure about? How have you turned it around to your advantage?

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